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The 100 best movies of all time

Jeanne Dielman

Jeanne Dielman, 23, Quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles (1975)

Jeanne Dielman, 23, Quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles (1975) Long considered a feminist masterpiece, Chantal Akerman’s quietly ruinous portrait of a widow’s daily routine. Her chores slowly yielding to a sense of pent-up frustration—should take its rightful place on any all-time list. This is not merely a niche film, but a window onto a universal condition depicted in a concentrated structuralist style.

More hypnotic than you may realize, Akerman’s uninterrupted takes turn the simple acts of dredging veal. Cleaning the bathtub into subtle critiques of moviemaking itself. Lulling us into her routine, Akerman and actor Delphine Seyrig create an extraordinary sense of sympathy rarely matched by other movies. Jeanne Dielman represents a total commitment to a woman’s life, hour by hour, minute by minute. ดูหนังออนไลน์ฟรี

Raiders of the Lost Ark

Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981)

Starting with a dissolve from the Paramount logo and ending in a warehouse inspired by Citizen Kane, Raiders of the Lost Ark celebrates what movies can do more joyously than any other film. Intricately designed as a tribute to the craft, Steven Spielberg’s funniest blockbuster has it all. Rolling boulders, a barroom brawl, a sparky heroine (Karen Allen) who can hold her liquor and lose her temper.

A treacherous monkey, a champagne-drinking villain (Paul Freeman), snakes (“Why did it have to be snakes?”), cinema’s greatest truck chase and a barnstorming supernatural finale where heads explode. And it’s all topped off by Harrison Ford’s pitch-perfect Indiana Jones, a model of reluctant but resourceful heroism. In short, it’s cinematic perfection.

La Dolce Vita

La Dolce Vita (1960)

Made in the middle of Italy’s boom years, Federico Fellini’s runaway box-office hit came to define heated glamour and celebrity culture for the entire planet. It also made Marcello Mastroianni a star; here, he plays a gossip journalist caught up in the frenzied, freewheeling world of Roman nightlife.

Ironically, the movie’s portrayal of this milieu as vapid and soul-corrodingly hedonistic appears to have passed many viewer’s buys. Perhaps that’s because Fellini films everything with so much cinematic verve and wit that it’s often hard not to get caught up in the delirious happenings onscreen. So much of how we view fame still dates back to this film; it even gave us the word paparazzi.